Best practice for spray painting

Do we spray?

A common question from our customers is whether or not we spray. Our answer is “Yes, wherever practical”. In the right hands,
spray painting can achieve a superior quality of finish and overspray can be adequately controlled.

Skill and Care of the Operator

Correct use of spray painting equipment requires a higher level of skill and care (or workmanship) than other forms of painting. Malcolm Grant (Company Supervisor) was a pioneer of airless spraying having purchased one of the first machines sold in Australia in 1965.

Malcolm’s vast experience in this field has been passed onto other Grant Painters’ staff through intensive on the job training.

Control of Overspray

Protection of surroundings and surfaces not being painted (by covering up or shielding) is a critical aspect of controlling overspray.

Also, the amount of overspray produced can be minimised by using the smallest possible tip orifice (which is determined by the viscosity of the paint) and a minimum level of hydraulic pressure.

The size of the spray fan can also be adjusted depending on the degree of control and accuracy required. For example, when spraying externally, a range of tip sizes may be required depending on wind conditions.

Type of Spray Equipment

Grant Painters have a variety of precision German engineered HVLP (High Volume low Pressure) and ‘Diaphragm’ airless pumps which have the versatility for ‘Finishing’ as well as ‘High Production’ applications.

Essentially these units can be turned down and used with far greater control than garden variety airless pumps.

Quality of Finish

With correct operator technique, spray painting achieves a finer finish for enhanced appearance as well as extra film thickness for optimum durability and washability. In fact, two spray applied coats of paint is usually the equivalent of three coats applied by brush or roller. Please note that it is often desirable, however, to brush or roll the primer or undercoat in order to work the paint into a course or porous surface (such as bare timber or masonry) or to fill up and disguise surface irregularities.

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